So the lesson in Concept Art today was an introduction to Mudbox and how we can texture and apply detail to our models.

To begin with, I’d downloaded a Maya file of some steps, wall and spiked post (as shown above) and a UV unwrapped image of the spiked post shown below.

We were then instructed to find some textures and apply them to the post with the theme of “a wooden post which has fallen down a rocky hill after being caught in paint. Imagine what would get stuck to that post.”

At first I began to think of mud, grass and moss being stuck to the metal top after and during the fall and the spikes on the wooden post itself would show signs of wear. More so, I was getting a medieval vibe from it, like it’d be used in a savage weapon kind of context so I deviated. I stuck with the wearing of the wood and searched for matching textures but where the metal spikes came in, I found a scratched steel/metal texture which I liked and onto that I’d applied some grassy textures onto the peak of the spikes where it’d hit and scrape against the ground.

From there I put on a dry leafy texture to give a little authenticity to what I was trying to achieve. I should mention at this point that with both the grassy and leafy textures, I used the lasso tool in Photoshop and moved the mouse around to create random shapes which I then made separate layers of to apply, because you wouldn’t get lots of straight lines from a fall would you?

uv

It turned out that there’d end up being so many layers to the UV file, I had to begin merging them together and renaming them all to keep track of what layer went where so the Photoshop file looked a little messy. From here I applied the textures to the post in Maya.

textured-post

We were then asked to open Mudbox to be shown how to add further details onto the model. This’d be the first real time I’d ever used Mudbox so I have to be honest here, I wasn’t expecting much in the way of results.

mudbox-tools

After being briefly shown how to add details, and how other games companies use Mudbox to do the same, it was up to us. I’d used a black colour to add shadow under the metal rim that you’d expect to see and from there I thought of adding some rust onto the metal itself – if the post is showing wear then its only natural that the metal would too. I used a spray tool to put specks of rust onto the model and then continuing the medieval weapon theme, I painted on blood. Spatters from impact and lines from where the blood has ran down the post and dried. Maybe its just me being morbid but from what I know from Medieval times, my thinking is that this has been used to crack someone over the back of the head. As it turned out, I was very impressed with what I’d made.

post

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s